US Drought At Historic Low Levels

Thirty years ago, James Hanse told Congress that global warming was going to make droughts worse.

FEROCIOUS STORMS AND DROUGHT SEEN – NYTimes.com

Ten years ago, the IPCC confirmed this.

Global Warming: Beyond the Tipping Point – Scientific American

Joe Romm announced the Southwest Permanent Drought In 2011.

Dust Storm Marks Beginning of Southwest’s “Permanent Drought”

US drought conditions are currently near a record low, with less than 5% of the country affected by drought. CO2 is above 400 PPM.

May 2017

But in 1934, with CO2 less than 310 PPM, three fourths of the US was experiencing drought,

May 1934

Climate scientists declare great certainty in their models and forecasts, even though the are wrong nearly 100% of the time.

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27 Responses to US Drought At Historic Low Levels

  1. Lasse says:

    Was it not driest during the prohibition in US?

  2. Brad says:

    2000 years ago a shaman looked up at the stars, read the entrails of a goat, and deciphered his tea leaves and came to the same conclusion. Despite all the advancements of modern science, people are still superstitious idiots who flock to the biggest doomsayer.

    • Arn says:

      Today the shamans are academics and persons with authority
      (and Bertrand Russel promised that…”people will be educated to believe everything authorities say,even of they are told that snow is black”)

      and in fact:little has changed,as the sheeple still blindly follow
      the authorities.
      The only two things that have changed is,that these authorities are no longer called priests or shamans,but “scientists”,politicians and celebrities.
      The other thing that has changed is:
      While authorities sometimes got punished by the people for lying for years and decades and making wrong predictions nowadays they can get away with everything forever.

    • FTOP_T says:

      Climate scientists.

  3. AndyG55 says:

    OT…. but a tid-bit for y’all

    Arctic, day 130

    Did y’all know, that the last 28 days in the Arctic have had the SLOWEST melt of the equivalent 28 days of any year this century ?

    • Brad says:

      Griff will be on here shortly to bemoan the slow melt as due to no ice left to melt. The white floaty things in the arctic are drowned polar bears and they don’t melt.

  4. AndyG55 says:

    OT Great post on WUWT..

    Very worth reading, especially for the education of AGW trolls ;-)

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/05/11/dr-fred-singer-on-global-warming-surprises/

  5. RAH says:

    Ha, nice and moist here. I understand the Palmer drought index works based on departure from the established average but man! They were sandbagging in downtown Anderson, IN to try and keep the White River from encroaching into the lower areas of downtown just last week. In the first 11 days of the month we have had twice the precip we usually receive in the whole month. But they have my area of Indiana as “moderately moist”?

    Taking advantage of the “moderately moist” earth my neighbor and I put in 200′ of 2″ drainage hose by hand using spades and back filled it today. The line runs from a small retention pond to a larger one slightly uphill and he has a pump set up on the smaller to pump it to the larger. This will keep run off water from running across our front yards during normal heavy rains. But when the ground gets saturated from days of heavy rain like it did last week the system get filled up because the water table is so high. Even in dead summer when the ground is cracking the head on my 82′ deep well will only be about 10′ below grade. So our water table runs pretty high even though we’re about 60′ above the level of the nearest creek. At least I will never have to worry about my well running dry even if conditions here were like they were in 1934.

  6. Oliver K. Manuel says:

    Nature’s abundant benevolence:

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/HIGHER-POWERZ.pdf

    . . . was hidden from humanity by a simple logical error in 1935:

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/Nuclear_Energy_Error7.pdf

    New lies are created each year to keep the public living in fear.

  7. Andy DC says:

    Repent sinners! Or you will pay to the climate gods with your life!

  8. AndyG55 says:

    There is a guy on JoNova that write THE BEST limericks..

    This is a classic….

    With millions worldwide taken in,
    By the Greens through renewable spin,
    While the wind-turbine yield,
    Is on pie-charts revealed,
    As a slice unbelievably thin.

    –Ruairi

  9. AndyG55 says:

    OT

    This will make the AGW scammer happy

    http://joannenova.com.au/2017/05/matt-ridley-wind-power-makes-0-of-world-energy/

    In whole numbers… Wind power makes 0% of world energy

    All that WASTED money.. for NOTHING !!!!!

  10. AndyG55 says:

    OT.

    Global something-or-other causes major problems for Australian grain storage!!!!

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-05-11/graincorp-strong-half-yearly-results/8518130

  11. Winnipegboy says:

    Here is an irony that strikes me every time i hear climate BS. The science is settled. Yet they keep saying ‘new study…it’s worse than we thought’. If the science is so rock solid, why were they wrong on the previous study?

  12. Larry Geiger says:

    It’s Florida. It’s May. It’s dry. The monsoon season will arrive soon and the little red areas will quickly disappear.

    • RAH says:

      From what I’ve been seeing, if the longer term weather models are correct, the Florida rainy season this year will be a bust for the central and northern parts of the state. Joe Bastardi at https://www.weatherbell.com/premium/ has said that as it looks now the relief will have to come from tropical storms.

      • gator69 says:

        My mother has lost several pine trees to the drought this year, and while I was visiting we witnessed a wildfire near Crystal River. Most Floridians cursed huuricanes, but now they are growing a bit nostalgic for the good ole days.

        • RAH says:

          I know that Crystal River area very well. Several years in a row I took my crew down there for work on Units 1 and 2 of the large generation station.
          Before 9/11 a regular person could visit and even get a tour but after that terrorist attack security became a lot tighter.

          • gator69 says:

            Ever Dine at Peck’s Old Port Cove in Ozello?

          • RAH says:

            If I did it’s been so long ago I don’t specifically remember it. What I remember are Cuban sandwiches and rock crab claws. A couple trips out on party boats fishing for Grouper and drinking a few beers. The storm of the century when the power plant was shut down because the spume blowing ashore shorted out the transmissions towers and having to move because our motel was flooded out. And hours and hours of hard dirty work cleaning and blasting the coal mill exhauster housings then installing high alumina ceramic tile liners in them and various coal and ash pipe fittings. And the stick of the decaying sea life in the huge condensers they used to convert salt water into distilled fresh water as they opened them up to clean them.

    • RAH says:

      My retired pilot friend in N. Florida is a small time rancher. He had the foresight to put in a stock of peanut hay, but many other ranchers didn’t.
      Recognizing the strong possibility of continuing dry conditions through the summer the UF Livestock and Natural Resources division has put this out to the Ranchers:

      “From: Fulton,Julia Rowena
      Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 11:25 AM
      Subject: Drought Information
       
       
      Fellow Livestock & Forage Producers:
       
      Our current conditions as you all are painfully aware, are dry but with perhaps another “good” chance of rain this weekend.  At least that is the forecast.  The north end of Columbia County is in drought, according to the US Drought Monitor.
       
      http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/RegionalDroughtMonitor.aspx?southeast
       
      I am unclear of their criteria for drought but I feel I am in it, in the south end of the county as well!  That said, I am sure many of you may be feeling the same way.  Grass is short and hay seems to be in short supply as well.  Depending on your situation your cattle may not look as bad as the weather seems this is due to the fact that in that really short grass is a lot of nutrition!  The problem may be in the amount, so supplementation may be in order.  Hay as well as feed may be necessary to get your animals through this dry time.  Also keep in mind your pastures.
       
      Grazing Management:
      While you may be supplementing your cattle or other livestock, they may still be grazing putting excess stress on your “future grass”.  You may find it necessary to hold your animals in a “sacrifice pen” until your pastures are ready for grazing.  Bahia grass should be grazed to a height of no less than 2 inches!  And don’t begin grazing it again until it is 4 to 6 inches!!  This helps ensure you have root growth to support more grass growth.  Continually grazing your pasture below its optimal height can result in the total loss of that stand of grass or certainly open it up for weeds to encroach!
       
      Watch for Weeds and Herbicide Use:
      During this time, you may need to pay extra attention to the weeds in your fields.  There can be poisonous weeds that your animals would not normally eat but because they are green and growing (how does that happen?) your animals will eat them.  So, take an extra walk through your pastures and double check.  One more thing about weeds in your fields and their control.  Right now, I would wait to apply any herbicide to your fields.  “The poison is in the dose”, but right now a low dose of herbicide could damage your pasture grass!  Because our pastures are stressed it would not take much to cause total death by an herbicide application.  Herbicide rates are for actively growing pastures and weeds.  So, until it rains you may need to hold off for herbicide spraying.  If you are spot treating or treating a fence line you may be OK, however as I said before rates are for actively growing plants.  Even weeds that are stressed may react differently to the herbicide (for example a higher rate may be needed to actually kill the weeds).
       
      Hay:
      In closing I am asking if you have hay for sale and would like to be on a list here at my office, please reply to this email with:
      Name
      Contact Information
      Hay Type (Bahia/Bermuda)
      Form (rolls/bales/baleage)
       
      And for those looking for hay you can email or call me.  Right now, I have no individuals on a list, I can only point you in the direction of your local feed stores.
       
      Thank you all for your time and I hope this was helpful.  It is long for an email but I felt the information was needed.  As always if I can help, please don’t hesitate to call, or email me!
       
      Best Regards,
       
      Paulette
       
      A. Paulette Tomlinson
      Livestock & Natural Resources Extension Agent
      UF/IFAS Extension Columbia County
      971 W. Duval Street, Suite 170
      Lake City, FL 32055
      Phone: 386-758-1030
      Fax: 386-758-2173
      apt@ufl.edu
       
       

       
      CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The information contained in this electronic message is confidential and intended only for the use of the individual or entity named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this email or anyof its components is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please “reply” to the sender. ”

      My friend says that the dry conditions right now are driving down livestock prices right now. Younger cattle not ready for slaughter are being heavily traded and sold because ranchers don’t have the fodder for them. Of course if the dry conditions continue into next year the pricing will go the opposite direction.

  13. gregole says:

    Southern Arizona is shown in moderate drought. Keep in mind, southern Arizona is a desert. But weirdly enough, it rained here last week. And temperatures have been really nice and mild. For a hot desert that is.

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