No Climate Strike In 1938

On this date in 1938, New York and New England were hit by a major hurricane which killed hundreds of people. There were no climate strikes that day, because people were dealing with real problems – like the hurricane and a World War about to start.

My mother remembered looking out her window in Brooklyn and seeing trees bent over to the ground in the wind.

This is safe, low CO2 world which modern children are lied to about by academics who belong in the State Pen, rather than Penn State.

TimesMachine: Thursday September 22, 1938 – NYTimes.com

TimesMachine: Friday September 23, 1938 – NYTimes.com

 

It was cold that day in the Northeast.

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5 Responses to No Climate Strike In 1938

  1. GW Smith says:

    Incredible!

  2. Brruce McGovern says:

    A popular book in the 40’s, WE TOOK TO THE WOODS, by Louise Dickinson Rich, told of the terrible mess in the woods of the Northeast USA caused by the winds of the hurricane.

  3. gregole says:

    We need to be grateful for the great times we live in climate-wise.

  4. rah says:

    And it happened when the atmospheric CO2 level was about 310 ppm.

  5. John Hall says:

    BLACK FRIDAY, was what Friday 13th January 1939 came to be known as, in Southern Australia and particularly Victoria. This particular week or so, established nearly all the still current Summer maximum records, (except one, 2009) in and around this part of Southern Australia. As kids and even adults, we would do the easy day car trip from Melbourne, up through the winding hairpin turned Black’s Spur pass, across the Great Dividing range to the resort town of Marysville. The feature of this trip was always the the Steavenson’s Falls picnic spot at the head of the narrow “V” shaped valley and the awe of the sight of the tall forest Eucalypts, some of them still pure black and without foliage They were also victims of Black Friday all those years ago before we were born. Eucalyptus Regnans (Mountain Ash) are said to require their seeds to be burnt, before they start their 200ft climb to adulthood. Funny old world, ain’t’ it?

    https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/lessons-learnt-and-perhaps-forgotten-from-australia-s-worst-fires-20190108-p50qol.html

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