100 Degrees In Arizona

On July 18, 1931 Parker, Arizona never dropped below 100F.

National Weather Service – NWS Phoenix

01 Jul 1931, Page 1 – Modesto News-Herald at Newspapers.com

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8 Responses to 100 Degrees In Arizona

  1. gregole says:

    It’s a different story in Arizona now. Been raining straight for the last couple of days in Phoenix.

    Temperatures in the 70s.

    MannMade Global Warming nowhere in sight.
    Permanent drought nowhere to be seen.

    MannMade Global Warming – biggest scientific fraud in history.

  2. Bob Cherba (@rbcherba) says:

    The 1931 article about the Ford River Rouge plant interested me. My Dad spent over 30 years in auto plants (Fisher Body No. 2) starting in 1931. I worked the summer of 1955 on the assembly line in the same plant. For many years, my Dad was a torch solderer (He filled in the gaps between the auto body panels with solder.) He spent the day with a blowtorch in one hand and an alternately an ~3/8″ square stick of solder or a wood smoothing paddle in the other. For protection against burns from molten solder that might splash his way, he wore a leather apron, and leather gauntlet gloves. Molten solder occasionally dropped onto or into his shoes, burning his feet. Unlike the gleaming, sparkling white auto factories you see on TV today, the auto plants had changed little since Henry Ford’s day through the 1950s. There were fans, but little else. My Dad worked through the historic hot summers of the 1930s.

    A new Fisher No. 2–Chevrolet assembly plant was built in about 1948, but the assembly area was certainly not air conditioned. The union workers had their own way of dealing with hot days — some of them stopped doing their jobs. The incomplete auto bodies went into the repair line and when that filled up, the main assembly line had to stop. Worked every time.

    My uncles and grandfather lived near Cleveland and worked in the steel industry at National Tube. Most everyone has seen photos and videos of steel workers at blast furnaces or handling red-hot steel in the process of being rolled or extruded into pipe and structural shapes. It was hot year around. (My grandfather was a brick layer who spent most of his time inside relining blast furnaces with fire brick.)

    Heat (and cold) have always been with us, and humans have always adapted — from the deserts and tropics to the Arctic. Some of us deal with 30-deg F swings every day, while others deal with 110-deg F swings from winter to summer. We’ll probably survive a few degrees of mostly natural global warming.

  3. Bob Cherba (@rbcherba) says:

    The 1931 article about the Ford River Rouge plant interested me. My Dad spent over 30 years in auto plants (Fisher Body No. 2) starting in 1931. I worked the summer of 1955 on the assembly line in the same plant. For many years, my Dad was a torch solderer (He filled in the gaps between the auto body panels with solder.) He spent the day with a blowtorch in one hand and alternately an ~3/8″ square stick of solder or a wood smoothing paddle in the other. For protection against burns from molten solder that might splash his way, he wore a leather apron, and leather gauntlet gloves. Molten solder occasionally dropped onto or into his shoes, burning his feet. Unlike the gleaming, sparkling white auto factories you see on TV today, the auto plants had changed little since Henry Ford’s day through the 1950s. There were fans, but little else. My Dad worked through the historic hot summers of the 1930s.

    A new Fisher No. 2–Chevrolet assembly plant was built in about 1948, but the assembly area was certainly not air conditioned. The union workers had their own way of dealing with hot days — some of them stopped doing their jobs. The incomplete auto bodies went into the repair line and when that filled up, the main assembly line had to stop. Worked every time.

    My uncles and grandfather lived near Cleveland and worked in the steel industry at National Tube. Most everyone has seen photos and videos of steel workers at blast furnaces or handling red-hot steel in the process of being rolled or extruded into pipe and structural shapes. It was hot year around. (My grandfather was a brick layer who spent most of his time inside blast furnaces relining them with fire brick.)

    Heat (and cold) have always been with us, and humans have always adapted — from the deserts and tropics to the Arctic. Some of us deal with 30-deg F swings every day, while others deal with 110-deg F swings from winter to summer. We’ll probably survive a few degrees of mostly natural global warming.

  4. rah says:

    Strange how Casa Grande was so much hotter for a longer duration than Phoenix. They just aren’t that far apart and Phoenix is nearly 100 meters lower than Casa Grande.

    • gregole says:

      This is a weird place. There are hot spots and cool spots and I can’t figure out what is going on. Maybe has something to do with wind patterns and the fact that the air is dry so has a low heat retention (something to do with enthalpy…) But as a motorcyclist, I do not own a car, I have noticed hot and cool spots. I do google earth and that doesn’t explain it either.

      Rainfall out here is the same. Take a look at this recent map. It will rain an inch in 24 hours and a mile away it rains 0.10 inches. Weird. The desert.
      https://www.maricopa.gov/625/Rainfall-Data

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