Northwest Passage – Closed For Business

I shall return just once, to point out how wrong you’ve been about the sea ice, in September

The Northwest Passage has been a favorite topic of climate scamsters for years.

With ice four meters thick, no one is traversing the Northwest Passage. The ice there is the thickest in many years, as it is in the Chukchi Sea.

DMI Modelled ice thickness

My Northwest Passage trip was cancelled last year, because of too much ice.

However, the Northwest Passage was open in 1903.

TimesMachine: March 9, 1907 

This graph shows the relationship between climate alarmists and reality.

graph.png (1130×600)

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17 Responses to Northwest Passage – Closed For Business

  1. R Shearer says:

    Depends on what your definition of “once” and “open” are.

    If once means many times and open means closed, then the Grifftard didn’t lie and is factually correct about something. But then, that depends…

  2. Ron Clutz says:

    The official record of ship transits through the NW Passage is kept by the Scott Polar Institute at Cambridge. Many ships have made through, including the explorers 150 years ago in wood vessels, along with sleds.
    The 19th century explorers are shown on map below:
    https://rclutz.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/arctic-explorers-fig2.jpg

    Fig.2. The ship tracks and winter-over locations of Arctic discovery expeditions from 1818 to 1859 are surprisingly consistent with present sea ice climatology (contours represented by shades of blue). The climatology shown reflects percent frequency of sea ice presence on 10 September which is the usual date of annual ice minimum for the reference period 1971–2000 (Canadian Ice Service,2002). On a number of occasions,expeditions came within 150 km of completing the Northwest Passage, but even in years with unfavorable ice conditions, most ships were still able to reach comparatively advanced positions within the Canadian archipelago. By 1859, all possible routes comprising the Northwest Passage had been discovered.

    The latest report from Dec. 2018 lists 290 crossings since 1903 and shows only two in 2018, with a third ship (a tug) exiting after wintering 3 years.
    https://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/resources/infosheets/northwestpassage.pdf
    More at post https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/todays-arctic-compares-with-150-years-ago/

    • arn says:

      Considering that nowadays ships are far more powerfull and solid
      and have excellent icebreakery
      one tends to think that the number of crossings should have massivly increased since then even if conditions got worse.

    • Anon says:

      Thanks for that! It was very interesting…

    • richard says:

      Back in the 19th century sailing ships were 150km short of completing the NWP. They were not ice breakers and had on board a 25 hp engine with enough coal for 12 days.

      Vs

      Today’s ships that navigate the NWP with all modern ice breaking equipment, underwater sonar, ice lights, ice strengthened and with 10,000+ hp engines.

  3. AndyDC says:

    With trillions of dollars at stake, the radical left and their lap dogs in the media will not allow the truth to get in their way.

  4. John F. Hultquist says:

    Thick ice, the reds in the map, are formed when wind and currents break up thinner surface ice, shove it around, and pile it up. Note the thick ice on the Lincoln Sea (search Google Earth). Nice map here.

    The Robeson Channel is the outlet in this area. It is about 15 miles wide and twice as long – like the neck of a wine bottle. From a wide area of the Arctic Ocean, ice gets into this area, and blocks it.
    There is water under the ice, so there is an ice arch. Eventually such arches fail.

    The Nares Strait is the main passage between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. Baffin Bay is to the south. Come “arch-break” time, ice will head south into warmer water, where the bergs will melt.

    April 15 is the anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on its maiden voyage in 1912. The exact location of the ship given here:
    wreck of the Titanic

  5. Laurie Ridyard says:

    It is 201 years, 4 months and 19 days since scientists first predicted ” a considerable change of climate ” causing the opening of the NW passage to commercial shipping…..

    “It will without doubt have come to your Lordship’s knowledge that a considerable change of climate, inexplicable at present to us, must have taken place in the Circumpolar Regions, by which the severity of the cold that has for centuries past enclosed the seas in the high northern latitudes in an impenetrable barrier of ice has been during the last two years, greatly abated.

    (This) affords ample proof that new sources of warmth have been opened and give us leave to hope that the Arctic Seas may at this time be more accessible than they have been for centuries past, and that discoveries may now be made in them not only interesting to the advancement of science but also to the future intercourse of mankind and the commerce of distant nations.”
    President of the Royal Society, London, to the Admiralty, 20th November, 1817 ( Royal Society Archives)

  6. Jim Hunt says:

    Au contraire.

    “Amundsen’s route” is looking ripe for melting out this summer:

  7. Psalmon says:

    Looks like Russia is serious about Arctic shipping, but has the sense to build ice breakers. Shanghai to Amsterdam is 10,000 km less over the Eastern Arctic/Russian coast. Could be interesting.

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/putin-presents-ambitious-arctic-expansion-program-62270980

  8. Martin says:

    Russia are developing new nuclear icebreakers designed to cope with 4 metre thick ice to keep their Northern route open all year.

    That’s the theory at least.

  9. Jim Hunt says:

    I thought I’d just pop back in here to point out that the Northwest Passage did “open for business” this year. It was open for “pleasure craft” by August 15th:

    http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2019/05/the-northwest-passage-in-2019/#Aug-16

    Meanwhile:

    “The MV Amazoneborg travelled from China to Canada via the Northwest Passage, while the MV Thamesborg sailed the exact opposite route from Canada to China.”

    • Gator says:

      Wow. The poor brown people hater found a reference to the NW passage being open. No not really. He made crap up, and then pointed at it as evidence of something. Sad.

      Genocide Jim cannot find anyone that wants to play with him. Nobody visits his anti-human doomer site, because only people who hate poor brown people worry about ice.

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