More Tough Times For Arctic Alarmists

Last year, Arctic alarmists got a lucky break when southeast winds during May and June blew the ice offshore from Alaska. This allowed them to excitedly blame the “record low Alaskan ice” on global warming. But it is not happening this year.

DMI Modelled ice thickness

The Alaskan coast is ice-free every summer, but that doesn’t stop journalists from lying about it – like they do about everything else.

Alaska’s Sea Ice Has Its Lowest August Levels Ever | Time

National Geographic published this map in 1971, showing sea ice hundreds of miles offshore from Alaska.

1971

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16 Responses to More Tough Times For Arctic Alarmists

  1. Steve Case says:

    National Geographic published this map in 1971, showing sea ice hundreds of miles offshore from Alaska.

    Besides that, the first three IPCC reports also went back to 1971:

    https://i.postimg.cc/1zxrL28j/image.png

    But by that third report the data started to change, and when the fourth was released the start date was changed to 1979.

  2. Scott K Jonas says:

    They also can’t seem to figure out that before the first layer of snow was ever deposited, the Arctic had to be “Ice Free.” And they ignore the long term historical evidence for several interglacial periods that left the Arctic free of ice.

    There’s some new news today about two global warming scientists trapped in the Artic because their ship can’t make it due to Coronavirus; interestingly it appears there is plenty of snow and ice and one of their greatest threats is all of the polar bears (that supposedly aren’t supposed to be there?).

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/arctic-explorers-trapped-remote-norwegian-141123861.html

    • Tor Stokkan says:

      Scott, here’s an interview on the morning talk show on TV2, a couple of days ago, with one of the Norwegian ladies, Hilde Strom and Sunniva Sorby. (Spelled Hilde Strøm and Sunniva Sørby in Norwegian). Both of them have years of experience in Polar research. She confirms that they have had a lot of encounters with the polar bears, but nothing dangerous so far. They saw the sun for the first time in March after months of total darkness.
      It’s Hilde Strøm talking…
      https://www.tv2.no/v/1562493/

  3. Brian D says:

    Many years from the early 70’s to the early 2000’s ice was not along the Alaskan coast.

  4. Tor Stokkan says:

    The Barents Sea’s cooling down can continue for decades

    Here is an article in Norwegian biggest news channel NRK, 18. May 2020
    Link: https://www.nrk.no/tromsogfinnmark/barentshavets-nedkjoling-kan-fortsette-i-flere-tiar-1.15021499
    ————————————————-
    English translation:
    The Barents Sea’s cooling down can continue for decades
    ——————-
    The Barents Sea has become colder and the ice is spreading. It causes some Arctic populations to pick up, and others to find new homes.

    Ecosystem cruise in the Barents Sea 2018, with “GO Sars”

    Photo:
    https://gfx.nrk.no/o3siJV5Py6oPhTocjSmDxgDYEQTbmEn6Q_JJfpDexSng.jpg

    MAJOR MAPPING: Since 2004, marine scientists have gathered knowledge about the Barents Sea “from top to toe” in the annual ecosystem cruise. They have collaborated with Russian colleagues at the Knipovich Polar Research Institute for Fisheries and Oceanography.

    PHOTO: ERLEND ASTAD LORENTZEN / HI

    Eirik Hind Sveen
    Journalist
    Published 18. mai kl. 15:17 updated 18. mai kl. 16:18
    share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by email
    The Barents Sea has become about one degree colder over the last five years .

    Warming up to 2016 had major effects on the Barents Sea ecosystem. Southern species spread northward, and populations of Arctic species declined. Now it is the opposite, in addition to stocks expanding or shrinking.

    An example of expansion is the snow crab. It has spread westward since 2016.

    – We assume that the snow crab has colonized most of the areas where it is possible for it to live in the Barents Sea, says Per Arneberg.

    Arneberg heads the marine ecosystem monitoring group, the Monitoring Group. They have just published their status report.

    Illustration:
    https://gfx.nrk.no/7rzFFllvFhm_Sd6HG64_fATjtwa8YAieWsumDmr_-gYg.jpg

    The map shows where the ice edge varied during April 2019. Each line shows the ice edge on a given day, and the figure shows that the ice edge can vary considerably from day to day and between 50 and 250 km over a month.
    The orange lines show where the ice edge (15 percent ice concentration) lay all days in April 2019 (source: NSIDC).

    ILLUSTRATION: INSTITUTE OF MARINE RESEARCH
    – More haddock, less herring
    Although the long-term consequences are unclear, the researchers have clear expectations for the next few years.

    – In the next couple of years, we expect cod stocks to decrease somewhat. Older fish are out of stock and only a strong new age class has been registered in recent years.

    The researchers also expect it to be more haddock and less herring.

    GO Sars
    Among other things, with the vessel “GO Sars”, researchers have mapped the temperature changes and the consequences it will have. On Monday, they deliver their report.

    PHOTO: HOLM, MORTEN / SCANPIX
    – Silda stays in the Barents Sea for the first three years, and then they migrate into the Norwegian Sea. We see that there are no new strong annual stocks.

    The long-term consequences, species by species, are currently uncertain.

    – Climate change could affect a good part of the population. The effects of this become greater the longer you progress in time. In addition, it depends on whether the emissions are limited or not, says Per Arneberg.

    Until 2016, temperatures in the Barents Sea increased. Then it turned.

    Temperatures have been lower. The politically contentious ice ridge has moved south.

    However, the fact that the sea is getting colder does not give reason to write off climate change. The cooling down is as expected, says Per Arneberg.

    variations
    – There are significant natural variations in the climate in the Barents Sea, he says.

    Per Arneberg, who has led the research group, says that the variations allow the temperatures to rise a lot in a few years and go down a lot in a few years.

    Photo:
    https://gfx.nrk.no/XXtG9vYy38cBjgYVwtruhgQqsgs9iWNi9FOKewUZfodQ.jpg

    Per Arneberg, HI
    Per Arneberg is the leader of the Supervisory Group.

    PHOTO: ARNSTEIN STAVERLOKK
    – The cold period we are entering now seems to be warmer than the previous cold period. Just as the warm period we had behind us was warmer than the previous heat. It fluctuates, but it swings around an increasing trend in temperature, says Arneberg.

    Many researchers believe the cycles between the hot and cold periods are between 60 and 80 years, says Arneberg.

    – Now it will be cooler, or at least not warmer, in the sea until the mid-2030s. Then we expect the temperature to rise again.

    • Tor Stokkan says:

      “-Silda” means “the herring”
      If you click the link to the article, you can just use Google Translate, as this was…

      • Tor Stokkan says:

        For the record, I am climate skeptic, to the point that I fear the next “Little Ice Age” more than anything. I just hope we could have the “The Modern Climate Optimum” as long as possible.

    • Tor Stokkan says:

      When they talk about “population” it’s bad translation — it means “marine life population” or “fish population”… but it’s just “Google Translate”…

  5. Gary Seymour says:

    That 1971 National Geographic map is NOT the state of Arctic sea ice at that time. It only shows the “Limit of Multi-Year Ice”, as it clearly labels the white area of the map in four places along its edge. Actual sea ice edge and limit of multi-year ice are very different properties.

    First, the limit of something is far different than the actual edge of it. Second, multi-year ice does not include first year ice. Ignoring these differences only underscores a willingness to deceive.

    • tonyheller says:

      Any ice which survives the summer immediately becomes multi-year ice. You have no clue what you are talking about.

    • Disillusioned says:

      Gary Seymour said, Actual sea ice edge and limit of multi-year ice are very different properties.

      On approximately September 15 each year the limit of multi-year ice and the sea ice edge are one and the same.

      Besides your comrade LIAR journalist who said parts of Alaska have never before been ice free, the deceiver is YOU, Gary.

    • Kurt in Switzerland says:

      Hey Gary,

      Didn’t you find the NG article claiming “no sea ice for the first time ever” to be ‘somewhat deceptive’ (or am I missing something)?

  6. Tor Stokkan says:

    Scott, here’s an interview on the morning talk show on TV2, a couple of days ago, with one of the Norwegian ladies, Hilde Strom and Sunniva Sorby. (Spelled Hilde Strøm and Sunniva Sørby in Norwegian). Both of them have years of experience in Polar research. She confirms that they have had a lot of encounters with the polar bears, but nothing dangerous so far. They saw the sun for the first time in March after months of total darkness.
    It’s Hilde Strøm talking…
    https://www.tv2.no/v/1562493/

  7. lance says:

    yet, look at how cold Alaska was this winter…and they reported…..crickets…

    • Stewart Pid says:

      Yeah but that was weather Lance not climate ;-) SARC
      There is a lot that the obsessive-compulsive alarmist shills can’t or won’t see or report on.

  8. aido says:

    But what if the Arctic ice were to melt completely? As it’s just a huge ice-cube, the sea level wouldn’t rise at all. The Northwest Passage would be permanently open to shipping, saving shipping lines massive amounts of time and money. The polar bears would migrate south and perhaps revert to being the black bears they once were. We’d have no more daft people trekking to the North Pole and getting frostbite; no intrepid sailors trying to sail to the North Pole and getting stuck in the ice half-way. Finally, the several nations who lay claim to the North Pole would see their flags floating away, removing a source of potential conflict. A win-win, I’d say.

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