Fully Renewable – Driven Out By Drought

The Anasazi had a very low carbon footprint and relied 100% on renewable energy like solar heating. Yet they were driven out by a 75 year long drought – with CO2 at pre-industrial levels.  Democrats hope we can achieve their level of renewable energy success.

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5 Responses to Fully Renewable – Driven Out By Drought

  1. Texas sharp-shooter says:

    All them holes were probably for floor joists for their front porches. So deforestation. Front porches lead to bbq, booze and seegars. Sounds deplorable to me so I’m sure they deserved it, the bastards.

  2. Colorado Wellington says:

    They also could have run out of tasty things to eat. Their staple foods were renewable but they overhunted themselves.

    Archaeologists call it “the C-word.”

    It’s a word so dirty, so divisive, that a recent scientific symposium about it was evasively titled “Multidisciplinary Approaches to Social Violence in the Prehispanic American Southwest.” But it was really about the C-word: cannibalism.

    Archaeologists argue bitterly over whether the ancient Anasazi, the ancestors of today’s Pueblo Indians, routinely killed and ate each other. From one point of view, the evidence seems overwhelming: piles of butchered human bones, some of which were apparently roasted or boiled. In one instance, ancient human feces even seem to contain traces of digested human tissue.

    But from another standpoint, Anasazi cannibalism doesn’t make sense. Eating people obviously isn’t part of modern Pueblo culture, and local tribes are deeply offended by the suggestion that their Anasazi ancestors may have been cannibals. Many researchers argue that the marks attributed to flesh-eating could instead be created during slightly less gruesome activities, such as the public execution of suspected witches.


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