July 10, 1936

On July 10, 1936 almost half of the US was over 100 degrees, and six states were over 110 degrees : North Dakota 114, South Dakota 114, Indiana 112, Montana 112, Nebraska 111, Minnesota 11.

The average temperature across the US was 94 degrees, and 44% of USHCN stations were over 100 degrees.

State	        Highest Temperature (F)
North Dakota	114
South Dakota	114
Indiana	        112
Montana	        112
Nebraska	111
Minnesota	110
Illinois	109
Kentucky	109
Virginia	109
Iowa	        107
Missouri	107
Pennsylvania	107
West Virginia	107
Wisconsin	107
Wyoming	        107
Alabama	        106
Colorado	106
Maryland	106
New Jersey	106
Ohio	        106
Delaware	105
Kansas	        105
Michigan	105
Oklahoma	105
Georgia	        104
North Carolina	104
South Carolina	104
Tennessee	104
Arizona	        103
New York	103
Arkansas	101
Florida	        101
Mississippi	101
Texas	        101
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6 Responses to July 10, 1936

  1. spike55 says:

    And in Australia, records have been found showing the hottest recorded temperature, in a Stevenson screen, was in Bourke in 1909

    This has , of course, been erased from the BOM data.

    http://joannenova.com.au/2020/07/hottest-day-recorded-and-deleted-in-australia-was-51-7-in-bourke-in-1909/

  2. nfw says:

    Bloody drought continues to fall from the sky in Sydney. It’s so droughty outside the ground is swampy. And more drought is forecast for the next week; the dams will overflow, again. Bloody drought, covering the “continent of Australia”, again.

  3. Ulric Lyons says:

    The hottest recorded July in Central England was in 2006, which was during the same type of heliocentric Jovian t-square as in 1936:

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/major-heat-cold-waves-driven-key-heliocentric-alignments-ulric-lyons/

  4. Haymaker says:

    Peak life on earth occurs at approximately .1% CO2 levels and above.

    At the current historically low .04% CO2 levels, earths plants and life are suffering.

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