Tornado Outbreak Of April 3-4, 1974

The worst tornado outbreak in recent history occurred on April 3-4, 1974 at the peak of the 1970’s ice age scare.

Temperatures on April 3, were very hot in the southeast with Texas over 100 degrees and much of the south over 90 degrees. Over the next 48 hours a strong cold front pushed across the region and spawned the tornadoes when very cold, dry air collided with the warm humid air in the southeast.

Scientists at the time blamed the tornadoes on global cooling, which they said was going to kill us all.

‎www.denisdutton.com/newsweek_coolingworld.pdf

Tornadoes are now blamed on global warming, which scientists say will kill us all. Biggest scam in science history.

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15 Responses to Tornado Outbreak Of April 3-4, 1974

  1. Tony – thanks so much for your regular (daily?) doses of reality. For balance, I also delve regularly into online alarmist offerings (e.g. ‘Skeptical Science’ and ‘Cimate Crocks’). Are you ok if I use selected stuff from your blog here on my own site and FB page (with accreditation of course).

  2. Rah says:

    Big season this year unlike the past several. 430 as of the end of March. Expect to see Bill Nye tighten his bow tie some more and come out to pronounce that humans caused it and must repent by feeding all deniers to the Lions.

  3. John F. Hultquist says:

    A friend’s house got cleanly wiped from its foundation in that series; just northeast of Cincy.

    Years later, WKRP in Cincinnati (TV show) had an episode where Mr. Carlson talked with a young caller (home alone). He convinced the child to go into the basement, then close the door. The sound of the door closing is heard. A few seconds later the phone goes to a buzz.

    My first encounter with strong wind was about 1955 (+ or -). I was running for home and a tree I’d run under came down in the direction I was headed. It sort-of followed me. Good experience — in hindsight.
    I blame your SUVs.

  4. Rah says:

    Well this truck driver is going to be racing the weather this week. Delivering Nestle’s product in Lansing, MI now. Go up to Romulus, MI and drop this refer trailer and hook to a plated trailer which I take to Findley, OH to p/u cans which I deliver at Newport news, VA 08:00 Wed. May be lucky and get out of there before the severe weather hits.

  5. Myron Mesecke says:

    The two largest tornado outbreaks were in 1974 and 2011. One during the global cooling scare and one during the global warming scare.
    What both years had in common were strong La Nina’s (colder Pacific water off the west coast).

    This might have given a slight boost to cold fronts, keeping them just a bit cooler before they moved across the Rockies where they cooled even further.

    The tropics don’t change temperature much so the warm moist air coming up from the Gulf of Mexico is pretty much a standard, not much variability.

    What can and does change is the temperature of cold fronts that collide with the tropical air.

    The greater the temperature difference between cold and warm air masses the greater the potential for severe weather.

    People are confused when they claim that warming is going to make more storms. If everything is warm, closer to the same temperature there is less change of severe weather. If their claim was true then summer would have the most storms. But in the real world it is spring and fall that has the most storms (when the temperatures between air masses are at their greatest.

  6. Andy DC says:

    I remember listening to the Louisville radio station that night, getting continuous reports of multiple devestating tornados on the ground in surrounding areas. I also recall there was a considerable amount of static on the radio, no doubt from the lightning that was being produced by the supercell thunderstorms, the ones that spawned those tornados. Pretty wild hearing that, considering the storms were 600 miles away.

    Yes. whenever there is any sort of natural disaster, hurricanes, tornados, even landslides, the alarmists are going to blame it on humans. What they fail to recognize is that there has been something called hurricane season and tornado season going back hundreds of years. If those things never happened before the advent of the horrible SUV, why would hurricane season and tornado season have been named as such?

    The fact of the matter is by far the deadiest US tornado happned 92 years ago (1925) and by far the most intense hurricane US hurricane took place 82 years ago (1935).

  7. klip says:

    Always follow the money. BEFORE “global warming” albert whore had a net worth of a little over $2million. Post “global warming” it has a net worth of well over TWO HUNDRED MILLION dollars and growing. ALWAYS follow the money. Always.

  8. cdquarles says:

    Oh, do I remember that outbreak. Fortunately for me, the bulk of the action was 100 miles away.

    I also remember that there were three waves to it, with a day or so in between. Only after the last cold front did the temps drop significantly. About 6 weeks later, another big cold blast came through such that I walked to school in early morning temperatures that were just above freezing … in May … just before Memorial Day … in the Deep South.

    The 2011 outbreak was far worse locally, though it wasn’t quite as warm before it nor quite as cold after it.

    Meridional flow and cold air aloft matter quite a bit with these things. Add wind sheer, enough moisture, warm surface and a jet streak/stream of sufficient strength, well, you get big severe weather outbreaks in the local areas where these conditions are at or above the dynamical threshold needed.

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