Border Crisis In 1932

During February 1932, Rio Grande City, Texas averaged 86 degrees for their afternoon maximums, and had 13 days over 90 degrees.

At the other border, the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, New York nearly had to be cancelled because of warm weather.

12 Feb 1932, Page 2 – The Brooklyn Daily Eagle at Newspapers.com

Ahead of the 1932 Winter Olympics in January, there was no snow at Lake Placid, and it was 70 degrees in New York City.

16 Jan 1932, Page 1 – The Los Angeles Times 

On January 14, 1932 it was 70 degrees in New York.

If this happened now, climate scientists would be 100% certain it was your fault, and demand immediate world communism.

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11 Responses to Border Crisis In 1932

  1. AndyDC says:

    The Winter Olympics at Lake Placid in NY were almost cancelled in January 1932 and then all of that extreme heat in Texas during February 1932. Panic in the streets! How many witches were burned at the stake for that extreme weather?

  2. GW Smith says:

    So true! That must have really got their panties in a wad not knowing who to blame. For them, AGW has become a life-saver.

  3. Christopher D Witzel says:

    I seem to remember the winter was mild in Sochi in 2014 for the Olympics. I know it was mild in the US too.
    https://slate.com/technology/2014/02/sochi-s-average-temperature-it-was-the-warmest-winter-olympics-ever.html

    • tonyheller says:

      The 2018 Olympics in Korea was probably the coldest on record. Sochi has palm trees. Not many of those in upstate New York.

      The winter of 2014 was the exact opposite of what you described. But thanks for the BS.

      The 2013–14 North American winter refers to winter in North America as it occurred across the continent from late 2013 through early 2014. The winter of 2013–14 was one of the most significant for the United States, due in part to the breakdown of the polar vortex in November 2013, which allowed very cold air to travel down into the United States, leading to an extended period of very cold temperatures.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013%E2%80%9314_North_American_winter

      • Colorado Wellington says:

        During the 2014 winter, global warming heat waves caused palm trees to flourish in subtropical climates in Russia and during the same period global warming cold blasts caused a mild winter with very cold extended temperatures the United States.

        Christopher D Witzel knows it because he reads his Holthaus religiously.

      • Colorado Wellington says:

        Christopher sometimes wonders if global warming could have been stopped in 2014 if Eric Holthaus followed up on his 2013 resolution to get neutered and give up air travel.

        The long-suffering meteorologist was ready to go extinct in 2013 but something went wrong and he survived till the 2016 election. He tries to hang on but it is not going well.

        @EricHolthaus
        I’m starting my 11th year working on climate change, including the last 4 in daily journalism. Today I went to see a counselor about it.

        @EricHolthaus
        I’m saying this b/c I know many ppl feel deep despair about climate, especially post-election. I struggle every day. You are not alone.

        @EricHolthaus
        There are days where I literally can’t work. I’ll read a story & shut down for rest of the day. Not much helps besides exercise & time

    • Gator says:

      Palm trees are definitely a dead giveaway that this is not a “Winter” location.

      Sochi has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa), at the lower elevations.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sochi#Climate

      Imagine Miami, with mountains.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humid_subtropical_climate#/media/File:Koppen_World_Map_Cwa_Cfa.png

      • arn says:

        If Hansens AGW predictions were just 5% real
        winter olympics would be 100% impossible by now.

        But it seems that climate was and is so constant that
        one can plan many years in advance as the award of the games happens many years before.

  4. Caleb Shaw says:

    I must strenuous protest the suggestion that any northerner would burn witches because of a warm January.

    The only time I deemed seventy degrees in January “bad” weather was one winter when my wife and I ran a snack bar at a cross-country ski area. During all other northern winters I’ve experienced, (66), a January thaw, even one not so wonderfully mild as one reaching seventy degrees, has people in New Hampshire wearing big smiles and incredulous looks-of-disbelief. (Of course, a sourpuss will always cynically grumble, “This will have to be paid for.”) A thaw is welcome because it lowers the heating bills, and cleans the sidewalks. (The sourpuss will grumble about the mud.) There is even less laundry to do, because you can wear fewer clothes. Everyone is happy, and happy people do not burn witches. In fact they may even thank witches.

    Three snowstorms in a row, and, well, if I were a witch, I’d lay low.

    If you look back in history, the horrible spectacle of people burning witches is associated with Global Cooling. Global Warming is usually associated with a climate “optimum”.

    The reason it was not an “optimum” in the USA in the 1930’s was because a bunch of overly optimistic homesteaders were attempting to farm semi-arid lands that got less than twenty inches of rain a year using farming practices from back east, where farmlands got over forty inches. Big Mistake, called “The Dust Bowl”. By 1950 over four million had moved out.

    Many who lost their homesteads were bitter about this setback to the American Experiment, and, angry about being reduced from a landowning farmer to a migrant worker, by mere weather, wondered if the Russian experiment might be a better alternative. So….what was happening in Russia at the same time?

    In Russia 1.8 million farmers lost their farms in the early 1930’s, not because of the weather, but because of one of the most massive witch-burnings of all time. Rather than “Okies” they were called “Kulaks”, and, rather than farmers who failed to make a go of it, they were farmers who did better than their neighbors. Stalin decided such success proved they were capitalists and “enemies of the people”, and their land should be taken and given to “the people” as a “collective”, as the Kulak themselves were sent off to be reeducated.

    The official Russian records we can now look at show something odd. Of the 1.8 million Kulak sent off to be reeducated, only 1.3 million arrived at the gulags. A half million vanished en route. And those are the official numbers. Solzhenitsyn states the number of Kulaks liquidated may have been six million.

    Official Russian statistics are lower, a half million who died on their way to the gulags, roughly 4o0,000 who died at the gulags, and roughly 400,000 who were executed during Stalin’s purges of the late 1930’s. And did this “social reorganization” result in better farming and less hunger? Did “collectives” prove to be more productive?

    Nope. Getting rid of all the smarter farmers, who were more successful, led to famine. Millions more died. And it had nothing to do with the weather.

    All of a sudden the fate of an Okie does not look so bad. Yes, they lost their homes, and yes, they did work picking grapes in California as migrant workers for a few years, but most picked themselves up and achieved successes later in life. The Kulak were not so lucky.

    One of the saddest parts of the crucifixion of the Kulak was the way young, liberal college students traveled out to the farmlands of Russia, (ignorant about what farming entailed), absolutely convinced they were doing good, and that they were helping to “further the revolution”, and then contributed to the witch-burning of the Kulak, becoming a sort of adjunct to Stalin’s secret police. Many of these “activists” were later “liquidated” by Stalin’s later purges, and those who survived largely became disillusioned “dissidents”. Socialism in Russia was a hell far worse than the hell Americans endured during the “Dust Bowl”.

    I bring this all up because when I point out what this site points out, concerning the fraud involved in the theory of Global Warming, to young “activists”, they often behave as if I am a Kulak who requires reeducation, or “liquidation”, or even that I am a witch who needs to be burned. These young activists have no idea of the hell that could be unleashed, if they get their way. They are the ones who need to be reeducated, and we should not flinch from this task. We should follow the example set by our host, and take this site’s Truth outside of this site. Now is not a time to politely stay silent.

    I should state the American experiment has something the Russian experiment lacked. The Kulak did not have the right to bear arms. Our founding fathers gave us the right to bear arms for a glaringly obvious reason, and it had little to do with hunting duck for dinner. However I pray every day that reason triumphs, and we do not need to bear arms.

    • Colorado Wellington says:

      Today’s Progressives understand that killing the kulaks was good for the Earth. Their cultivated lands were allowed to return to their natural state when the collective farms took it over. Stalin was second only to Chairman Mao and Genghis Khan in his activism for the Green New Deal manifesto.

      Why Genghis Khan was good for the planet

      Laying waste to land scrubbed 700m tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

      By Jon Henley
      The Guardian
      Wed 26 Jan 2011 15.00 EST

      His empire lasted a century and a half and eventually covered nearly a quarter of the earth’s surface. His murderous Mongol armies were responsible for the massacre of as many as 40 million people. Even today, his name remains a byword for brutality and terror. But boy, was Genghis green.

      Genghis Khan, in fact, may have been not just the greatest warrior but the greatest eco-warrior of all time, according to a study by the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Energy. It has concluded that the 13th-century Mongol leader’s bloody advance, laying waste to vast swaths of territory and wiping out entire civilisations en route, may have scrubbed 700m tonnes of carbon from the atmosphere – roughly the quantity of carbon dioxide generated in a year through global petrol consumption – by allowing previously populated and cultivated land to return to carbon-absorbing forest.

      An intriguing notion, certainly. But possibly not a guaranteed vote-winner for the Green party’s next manifesto.

      https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2011/jan/26/genghis-khan-eco-warrior

      True, there may be a bit of resistance among the American electorate but the world’s only hope is that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-New York) and the Democrats running for President don’t shy away from what must be done for the planet. They stand on the shoulders of giants.

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