The Least Extreme Summer On Record In The US

The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present and is gravely to be regarded. Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific/technological elite.

  • President Eisenhower 1961

“We redistribute de facto the world’s wealth by climate policy,”

  • Ottmar Edenhofer – IPCC Co-chair 2008-2015

Climate alarmists are convinced extreme weather is increasing and out of control, due to a 0.0001 mole fraction increase in a harmless, essential trace gas.  They call this “mainstream science.”

Trump has finally named a science adviser, and it’s an extreme weather expert – Axios

In fact, the US is having the least extreme summer on record. The number of record daily summer temperatures (maximums and minimums) is at an all time record low.

The number of all time maximum summer temperatures is also at a record low, at zero.

The number of record daily temperatures is seventh lowest on record

Summer afternoon temperatures this year have been average, and have been declining for over a century.

The frequency of hot summer days has been 44th lowest on record, and declining for over a century.

US Tornado count has been lowest on record, and there have been no hurricanes striking the US. By this date in 1886, the US had already been hot by four hurricanes,

Storm Prediction Center WCM Page

Fire burn acreage is down 90% since the 1930’s and 41st lowest on record (so far) since 1926.

National Interagency Fire Center

If mainstream science ignores actual data and reports the exact opposite of reality, then they have become nothing more than the Big Lie. President Eisenhower warned about this.

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11 Responses to The Least Extreme Summer On Record In The US

  1. Winnipeg boy says:

    Excellent package of charts.
    I have a good natured, on-going public battle with a buddy from work via group email.
    I often use your work as ammunition against his NOAA propaganda.
    I usually win the arguments.
    Cheers.

  2. Bob Hoye says:

    How can this set of outstanding charts be presented to liberals?
    The problem is that they are anxiety dependent and the focus changes from issue to issue. This set of charts may prompt agnosticism. Inconceivable! The loss of the current issue will have to be replaced by a new concern.
    In the early 1970s, it was “Global Cooling”.
    Then it was “Acid Rain”.
    Then “Holes in the Ozone Layer”, which roughly occur where the sun don’t shine. That is to say, the polar regions when it is night all day.
    And we can’t overlook the “Alar on Apples” horror.
    Then its been “Global Warming” and “Climate Change”.
    To get the almost terminally anxious off of their climate hysteria they will have to have a new threat.
    Any ideas?
    Plastic straws?
    Maybe back to “Global Cooling”?
    Bob

    • Josh says:

      Liberals suffer from cognitive dissonance. They will simply highlight the temperature of Death Valley and the urban areas suffering from strong urban heat island effects. Liberals do not have much going for them: the Arctic is cold, Antarctica’s warmth is not enough to decrease the sea ice extent to any record low, rural Japan warmth was not near record heat, wildfires are not increasing, hurricanes are nonexistent in the Atlantic, and the Pacific Ocean’s warmth is not enough to stop the downward trend of the
      globalocean temperatures.

    • Colorado Wellington says:

      “How can this set of outstanding charts be presented to liberals?”

      Piece of cake.

      The way to make these charts acceptable to “liberals” is to link them to a slate of illiberal political demands and praise the Chinese Communist government as the only one enlightened enough to prevent the next planetary disaster.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/09/opinion/09friedman.html

    • Sam says:

      If you could only get them to read Chricton’s “Sate of Fear”, it might open their eyes as he addresses the idea that we are kept in a state of worry and fear by the media

  3. Andy DC says:

    Despite the desperate histrionics of the alarmists, most of the crop producing areas in the US have averaged within a degree or two of normal during this past July.

    • RAH says:

      Lack of rain has been a bit of a problem for those in the plains and the upper areas of the corn belt in the west. We got dry here in my part of central Indiana for a time, though not dry enough for the ground to start cracking as it does when we have a really hot and dry spell in the summer. That, however, is in the past as we have received plenty of rain the last few days. My grass is once again growing like it’s spring time.

      And the extended forecasts point to August being generally at or below average temps for most of August. The NE however is in for some warmer than average temps, but they will also get plenty of rain to go with it.

      Really the most remarkable thing about the weather in the western portion of the NH this summer has been the persistent near record cold SSTs in the Atlantic. The hot and dry weather England and points in Europe to the east have had is nothing new or remarkable. A similar heat wave occurred in 2003. It is also balanced by colder conditions in southern Europe. What is happening in the Arctic would not be remarkable if not for the fact it falsifies the years of doomsday projections of the alarmists. But the fast flip of the SSTs in the in the N. Atlantic really is exceptional.

  4. GW says:

    Why would Trump nominate him ? Has he been hoodwinked ? Or is this guy a stealth operator and going to slam all the liars and their BS ?

  5. garyh845 says:

    Tony . . great post, naturally.

    But, “By this date in 1886, the US had already been hot by four hurricanes,” needs a couple of corrections. In, “US Tornado count” – ‘Hot’ should be ‘hit’, and it’s a ‘period’ at the end, not a comma.

    Pls feel free to delete this message.

  6. Sean says:

    I sit on the fence but some climate change evidence seems convincing. The difference between a normal testosterone count and a low count is just a few nanograms per litre of blood. A nanogram is a billionth of a gram and in a litre of blood is almost undetectable without extremely sensitive equipment. If such minute quantities can change a mans behaviour then is it so far fetched to understand that a doubling of CO2 can prevent solar radiation from leaving our atmosphere just like the glass walls of a greenhouse. And the reduction in acreage burnt each year is surely due to the amount of fire equipment we now use to defend against the fires.

  7. Olav Ankjær says:

    It is true Sean, in many systems like human body and ex. plants, variations of certain elements (molecules) in millionths will make changes. However, one has “evidence” (in most cases) that these trace elements have such influence.
    But that does not mean that you can transfer this directly to other systems. The conclusion can not be that because certain systems may have or have changes in millionths of variations of certain elements, other systems will react similarly.
    Firstly, you need proof before you can conclude how systems respond to variation within the system. When evidence is difficult to build or construct, change over time could “confirm” or falsify the theory or hypothesis.
    It is in this area that the CO2 hypothesis fails. Even a strong increase in CO2 gives very little if any (demonstrable) increase in global temperature, beyond what can easily be explained by natural variations. It may be because there is so little of it, trace gas, that the influence is not particularly noticeable, or its logarithmic effect and low sensitivity do not cause measurable impact. There are also very few if any evidence of change in the “global climate”, and local climate variations have always been a lot of. Ex, AMO and ENSO provide great local variations.
    The relatively newly discovered PDO strongly affects the United States.

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