November 26, 1896 Heat

Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.

  • Mark Twain

There has been no trend in November 26 US temperatures since the start of records in 1895.

On this date in 1896, upstate New York reached 78 degrees, and most of the East Coast was over 70 degrees.

1896 was one of the world’s worst years for heatwaves

A ten day heatwave during August 1896 killed thousands of people in the US, many of them in New York.

1896 Heatwave

Australia had their worst heatwaves on record during January of 1896.

TimesMachine: August 18, 1896

17 Jul 1896 – HEAT-WAVE IN EUROPE.

If government funded climate scientists were actual scientists, they would want to understand this – rather than simply bury it.

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3 Responses to November 26, 1896 Heat

  1. Andy DC says:

    During late September 1896, a CAT 4 hurricane struck Florida and maintained enough intensity to un-roof entire blocks of homes in Washington, DC and cause extensive structural damage to large buildings.

    With that, plus all of the widespread 1896 heat, today’s alarmists would have totally convinced us that we were all going to die!

    • RAH says:

      Wait till they get a load of this winter. Joe Bastardi believes it may well be the coldest since 2000 for the Midwest and east coast. Serious cold starts at the end of next week and he is forecasting it to hold on with one cold wave after another coming down. Cue the talk of the “Polar Vortex” from the morons. Hope those in those areas have good batteries in their vehicles and checked their anti-freeze because I think come Christmas even Santa is going to be freezing his tail off!

  2. bru92 says:

    Seems the ‘average temps’ & ‘average over 65’ charts don’t do the Dust Bowl years much justice. Averages in that time appear as cooling?

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