Climate Fraud Indicators: Snow Cover

The EPA claims that spring snow cover is declining, and fall/winter snow cover is remaining steady. They say it is evidence of global warming.

Climate Change Indicators: Snow Cover  This indicator measures the amount of land in North America that is covered by snow

Decreases in snow cover have largely occurred in spring and summer, whereas fall and winter snow cover have remained fairly steady

Since CO2 hit 350 PPM 30 years ago, April 1st snow cover has increased 10%.

Rutgers University Climate Lab :: Global Snow Lab

Fall and winter snow cover have also increased.

 

Rutgers University Climate Lab :: Global Snow Lab

Rutgers University Climate Lab :: Global Snow Lab

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6 Responses to Climate Fraud Indicators: Snow Cover

  1. arn says:

    Maybe the snowcover has increased by 10% but the overall thickness
    is 70% less than it was 50 years ago.
    ((I’m just writing the excuse Griff will use within 2-3 years when the ever increasing snowcover can no longer be denied and they will then use the arctic trick to make people believe that the ice is still skrinking somehow)

    An alternative excuse?:”Global Warming is the reason for more snow”((they will find a way to make it sound plausible for the Griffs))

  2. R. Shearer says:

    It was another scorcher in Brussels today, high of 71F.

    • R. Shearer says:

      Sorry, maybe a “pleasantly warm” 78F.

    • Brad says:

      Actually it was around 77 fahrenheit :). They keep on saying warm weather caused by GW and is extraordinary weather. Normal temperature is around 59 fahrenheit this time of year.

  3. Bruce of Newcastle says:

    The Rutgers snow lab data fits the AMSU satellite temperature anomaly data well. It doesn’t fit the GISS temperature data at all.

    Does that mean that Gavin’s is the right one and the melting point of water has risen by 1 C in the last century or so? /sarc

  4. John F. Hultquist says:

    In some years — up to 3 years after major wildfires — snow may melt faster in the spring.
    Soot (black) from the fire will settle (from trees) on snow. This is likely not a big area compared to total snow cover, but locally it may be important for irrigators.
    In some cases there are larger fires because of the Smokey Bear effect.
    ICEs and global warming have nothing to do with these issues.

    The fire/soot/snow bit is be investigated in Washington State.

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